Inside ASCE at LSU

To understand what a student organization is all about, just take a look at what the students spend their time doing! ASCE at LSU provides an inside look at their activities from the 2015 fall semester.

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) at LSU had a busy fall semester with our bi-monthly student chapter meetings, attending community service events and touring the Patrick F. Taylor construction site on LSU’s campus. The most recent chapter meetings featured guest speakers from ASCE Coasts, Oceans, Ports and Rivers (COPRI) and BASF. Daniel Dehon and Jarret Bauer, two professionals in the field, spoke about the Coasts, Oceans, Ports and Rivers Institute of ASCE and how students can get involved. Kenneth Arceneaux, an employee of BASF, spoke about various civil engineering projects, tips on how to be successful and ethics in engineering.

Our ASCE student chapter joined the Louisiana Water Environment Association (LWEA) student members for a community service event to clean up the LSU lakes on October 11, 2015. A total of 24 students participated in removing debris and trash around the lakes and the surrounding areas.

LSU Lake Clean-Up

LSU Lake Clean-Up, October 11, 2015

In conjunction with the ASCE Baton Rouge Branch, LSU ASCE student members attended a luncheon featuring the $110 million Patrick F. Taylor Hall renovation and expansion project. Guest speakers Roger Husser, Director of Planning, Design and Construction for LSU Facility Services, and Mike Lemoine, Operations Manager for the Lemoine Company, spoke of the construction progress made in the expansion, and of the future phases in construction. A tour of the perimeter of the construction site followed the meeting, guided by Roger Husser.

Rendering of Completed Patrick F. Taylor Hall - East Elevation

Rendering of Completed Patrick F. Taylor Hall – East Elevation

The spring semester is sure to be even busier with our Concrete Canoe and Steel Bridge competitions! To learn more about ASCE at LSU, visit asce.lsu.edu or follow us on Instagram @ascelsu.

Ten Things to Do to Be Successful in College

Updated 5/24/2017

This post comes to you from Dr. Joe Odenwald, Assistant Dean of Engineering Student Services. He says, “This list is neither comprehensive nor particularly original. It’s a compilation of good practices for students I have seen in ten years working with college students.”

1. Begin with the end in mind. This comes from Stephen Covey’s book Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. The idea is that we envision in our minds where we want to go, who we want to be. His notion is that there are two creations, first in our minds and then in the physical. To be successful, you need to see the endpoint: graduation. President Alexander often says, “Graduation starts today.” And it does. Covey also talks about a personal mission statement. You need to begin drafting yours now.

LSU4488-Commencement_Beth_small

The end is near! Well…sort of. But you’ve got this.

2. Go to class, every day. I really think this may be the best piece of advice anyone could give. When professors discuss students who are successful and those who are not, they often mention class attendance. If you aren’t in class your ability to keep up, especially with math and science courses, is limited. This really isn’t affected by how smart you are, because at this level it is as much about having the information as it is knowing what to do with it.

3. Get plenty of rest. Yes, you are young. And probably quite healthy. But you need to sleep, regularly. This helps keep you healthy so that you can attend class and remain awake while in class.

Get sleep.

Get sleep…enough said.

4. Eat a balanced diet. Easy on the Cane’s chicken and pizza and other heavy foods. Seriously, the freshman fifteen is no myth. And weight gain can have a negative impact on mental health, too.

5. Get some exercise. The best way to deal with stress is to sweat it off. It also can energize you and enable you to focus better once you get back to your studies.

exercise

This kind of exercise is probably not what you need on a daily basis.

6. Make friends, but not too many. You need a circle of companions with whom to share the ups and downs of college life, but don’t make the mistake of becoming such a socialite that you can’t squeeze in studying.

7. Use a calendar. Whether you are a Google calendar person or an old fashioned wall calendar person, having one to map out all your tests, projects, etc., is a great way to keep things from sneaking up on you.

8. Have some fun, but not too much. You’re all free to recreate as much as you like, but there are consequences. Going out Thursday through Saturday nights is not going to mesh well with your studies. Schedule fun as a reward for good grades, etc.

college

You can have a social life and keep up with your classes…honestly!

9. Call Mom and Dad. Or your grandparents or guardians. They love you and want to hear from you. Maybe not every day, but work in some phone calls amid texts. They want to hear your voice, and hearing theirs will help motivate you.

10. Try to do what’s right in every situation. Look out for your neighbors and friends. Be academically honest. Think about how you navigate relationships, treating others as you would like to be treated.

[Editor’s note: photos and captions not provided by writer.]


Student Services can help you with academic counseling, general assistance and referrals, scheduling, and more. They are located in the Audubon Sugar Institute Building off South Stadium Drive near Tiger Stadium between the Military Science Building and the LSU Police Station. To schedule an appointment with a counselor, you can use their online appointment scheduler.

Encounter Engineering at LSU Before School Starts

Encounter Engineering (E2) Camp begins in just a few weeks for our incoming class of 2019. For you younger students out there, here’s some more information about our camp and a blog from a student who’s not only attended the camp herself, but worked for it as an upperclassmen.

About Encounter Engineering
Encounter Engineering (E2) is a one week bridge camp hosted the week before the fall semester each year. It introduces incoming engineering, construction management, and computer science first-year students to the College of Engineering and helps them transition from high school to college mindsets. Dedicated staff, counselors, and peer mentors work hard to give these students everything they need to succeed. Each group of incoming freshmen is paired with a peer mentor that is either currently in the student’s preferred major or a major of interest in the College of Engineering. Peer mentors guide students through a variety of activities, lead design and professional development sessions, and host evening activities with industry personnel.


Giselle Medina

Giselle Medina

Hi, my name is Giselle Medina, and I am currently a senior in mechanical engineering at Louisiana State University as well as a peer mentor for the Society of Peer Mentors. I am originally from Beaumont, Texas, so coming to LSU not knowing anyone else in engineering was stressful to think about.

As an incoming freshmen, participating in Encounter Engineering (E2) created a smooth transition from high school to college academics. One of the great things that my family and I liked about this camp is that I got to move in a week early and adjust to the campus before college classes even started. This was such a comfort since I was able to become familiar with the buildings and campus a week in advance. While this was great, I quickly realized how much more this program had to offer.

A few weeks before camp even started, I remember getting an email from my peer mentor introducing herself and telling me all about Encounter Engineering. Just this simple act was enough to get me excited! I could not wait! The first day of camp, my parents and I went to the theater in the LSU Student Union and were introduced to our peer mentor and student groups. After that, I remember saying goodbye to my parents, going to my residence hall, and making friends with other campers immediately. Not only was this camp an eye opener to life as an engineering student at LSU, but it was a great way for me to make friends and get to know students before school even started!

I remember the first few days were super eventful. We were working on a Rube Goldberg design project with our team which helped us get a better understanding of what engineering was like. A Rube Goldberg is a project where you complete a simple task in as many steps as possible. We were given a limited amount of supplies with some “currency” we could use at a “shop” in case we wanted to buy more supplies. The team with the most steps, least amount of money spent, and a successful Rube Goldberg would win the contest. Unfortunately, my team did not win, but it was still a fun and insightful experience!

Students at Encounter Engineering camp

Students at Encounter Engineering camp

I also attended mock calculus and physics classes during camp and met some of my future professors. I knew my calculus and physics professor before school even started! Each class was set up to be an example of what an actual college class was like. This proved to be another big help for me because I had a better understanding of what to expect. Towards the end of E2, we all attended a large industry dinner with industry personnel from different companies. This was a huge opportunity for us since we were able to network with professionals before our other classmates.

One of my favorite parts about the camp was the academic discussions with peer mentors and faculty about transitioning into college, as well as how to keep up good grades and a social life. No one can give better advice than a student who has been in your shoes and has gone through the classes you will be going through. The entire experience was invaluable and definitely helped prepare me for my first day. Without E2, I would not have met the friends I currently have today. I would not have had a role model and mentor in my major that I could go to for advice or academic help. Most importantly, I would not have become a peer mentor and helped other incoming freshmen as I do today.

So why should you consider Encounter Engineering? I would say for a few reasons. It has been observed that students who went attended the E2 camp were more likely to stay in the College of Engineering and succeed in their classes versus students who didn’t participate. Just one week of mock classes, team building, discussions, design challenges, and more led to tremendous outcomes. Also, students are given a valuable connection through Encounter Engineering – their peer mentor. My first summer as a peer mentor, I had a group of four students. Even after camp was over, I kept in contact with most of them. I was able to give them study aid books and online copies of my textbooks that helped them in their freshmen classes. I was able to answer any questions they had about the campus or the College of Engineering. I was able to give them advice about mechanical engineering classes, and it simply goes on from there. The last reason, and a big reason why I participated, was because it gave my parents and me peace of mind about starting college. My parents knew that I would be in good hands and learn from the program. I knew that I had an extra week to learn about LSU, learn from upperclassmen in the College of Engineering, and meet my classmates before school started.

– Giselle Medina
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

For more information about Encounter Engineering, please visit our website at www.eng.lsu.edu/current/freshmen/e2.

Senior Design Project: Solving Real-World Problems

This month’s blog post comes to us from Alex Beem, a senior majoring in petroleum engineering. Originally from Houston, Texas, Alex decided to pursue his passion for the oil and gas industry. After visiting LSU’s College of Engineering, Alex knew that Baton Rouge would be the place he would call home and earn his undergraduate degree.

A long journey will finally come to an end on May 15, 2015. It all started my freshman year with the basic arithmetic and science classes when I was trying to find my place in this new world we call “college.” As I worked my way through the course flowchart, I kept my focus on the prize; which was to graduate from LSU (and receive my ring and diploma). I entered my senior year as motivated as ever to reach this goal and the courses were much more interesting than the ones I had taken earlier in my college career. Before my classmates and I could graduate, we had one more task to complete: a Senior Design Project.

Alex Beem

Alex Beem

In case you are not familiar with the Senior Design course, it is a class that is required for LSU engineering students to graduate. Future engineers have the opportunity to showcase their knowledge by solving a problem for industry professionals. This class is two semesters long and is composed of two phases. The first phase is planning, while the second is implementation. The planning phase taught me the organizational skills I needed to achieve the task at hand, and the implementation phase showed me that not all things can be planned for.

My group did our project on “Decline Curve Analysis for Unconventional Reservoirs.” If you are familiar with the oil and gas industry, you know that a major hurdle has been crossed recently. Due to new technology, many companies have started drilling into shale formations as opposed to sand formations. A reservoir in a shale formation would be considered an “unconventional” reservoir. The project we are working on analyzes new methods of determining production rates from these formations, since research has proven that the old way of making these decline curves resulted in inadequate results.

When first learning about this project, we knew it would be a difficult project that could yield great results. My group consists of three other guys: Ryan Burke, Paul Caplis, and Stephen Harris. What was so great about this group is that we all had different strengths to offer the team. Paul utilized his skills with computer programming, and designed a program in MATLAB to run his simulation. Stephen did the same for his model, and offered some much needed charisma during our many presentations. Ryan was very good at understanding the big picture of the project, and used his experience from his past internships to help guide us in making a professional presentation. I used my organizational skills to effectively communicate with the group, plan meetings, and set deadlines for various facets of our project.

For our senior project, we each took a developed model and applied it to a specific geographic region. We then took the data that was made available to us and forecasted decline curves. After making our forecasts, we were able to show that certain methods worked better than others. My teammates and I are very proud of our project. We believe it is a very relevant issue, and that our project will make a difference for some companies in the industry.

Forecasted decline curves for senior design project

Forecasted decline curves for senior design project

When I was a senior in high school, I remember touring the petroleum department and seeing the students mixing mud in mud lab. I remember seeing people sitting in front of the computers in the Patrick F. Taylor computer lab with three or four books open at the same time trying to do their homework, and thinking to myself that will be me one day. I think the biggest thing I have taken away from my senior year at LSU is that all of the hard work from early on has finally paid off. It is rewarding to know that you can work hard, but also have fun with what you do. That is the purpose behind the senior design project. We are now equipped with the knowledge to solve real-world problems and we can find fun and creative ways to do it.

-Alex Beem
Petroleum Engineering

Summer Camps for High School Students

XCITE lab group

XCITE lab group

Dozens of high-achieving high school students converge on LSU’s campus each summer to learn about the various disciplines available at the College of Engineering. The Recruiting into Engineering High Ability Multicultural Students (REHAMS) and Xploration Camp Inspiring Tomorrow’s Engineers (XCITE) LSU Residential Summer Camps introduce students to construction management, computer science, and engineering through workshops designed to teach through hands-on, problem-solving exercises. The camps staff partners with LSU faculty and industry professionals to create novel programming that connects what are often abstract scientific and mathematical concepts to students’ everyday experiences.

This year, the College’s Assistant Manager for Recruiting, Terrica Jamison, begins her tenure as the administrator of the camps. She is bursting with ideas to enhance campers’ weeklong stay on campus, and she eagerly shared them with The Engineered Tiger.

What are you most excited about as you prepare for 2015 REHAMS and XCITE?

I meet with thousands of students across Louisiana and beyond in my role as the College’s assistant manager for recruiting, and I often encounter talented high schoolers who either don’t know much about engineering or don’t think they would fit in at the College. REHAMS and XCITE give me additional avenues to introduce students from all walks of life to engineering and show them at it is a viable option for them.

Students at the PERTT Lab

Students at the PERTT Lab

What will be different about REHAMS and XCITE this year?

My staff and I are focused on building lasting connections between engineering and the students’ everyday lives. The challenge my staff, and both our LSU and industry partners face, then, is to show the students that they already engage in the type of problem solving that successful engineers, construction managers, and computer scientists use in the professional world. That’s a tall order in just one week! My approach this year is to teach by doing, so participants should expect innovative programming that presents them with real world problems they can solve to improve the lives of others. Students might be building a robot one day and creating an app the next. I haven’t finalized the schedule yet, but nothing is off the table.

I have also prioritized student-to-student interaction. It can be difficult (and a bit intimidating!) for students to situate themselves within the engineering discipline exclusively through their interactions with tenured faculty and established professionals. I want the students to visualize themselves here as successful LSU engineers, so I’m working with faculty to incorporate some of their top graduate students into the camp curricula. Additionally, I am also asking our industry partners to make junior members of their staff who are LSU alumni available to meet with the campers whenever possible. Our students and graduates are what make the LSU College of Engineering such a powerful force, and we want to capitalize on those resources by showing the campers the elite corps of aspiring and working engineers they can join if they work hard.

In the past, REHAMS and XCITE included general sessions about college life. Will you continue that tradition?

Absolutely! For some of our students those sessions are their first exposure to college prep, and helping to bring college within reach for all of our campers is one of my top priorities. Both REHAMS and XCITE will include a visit to LSU’s new Olinde Career Center, where they will learn about proper interview dress and techniques. They will also attend sessions with Enrollment Management and Student Aid & Scholarships, where LSU staff will go through the college, scholarship, and financial aid application processes in detail.

Speaking of application process, have the REHAMS or XCITE applications changed?

The selection process will be more competitive moving forward, so yes, I have made a few changes. The selection committees will place greater weight on the students’ motivations for attending the camps, so we increased the space allotted to student essays. We will evaluate the essays for both purpose and clarity and give preference to those who can best articulate how they will use what they learn at the camps to forge a pathway to a career in engineering, construction management, or computer science.

We are also asking parents and students to return all application materials, including transcripts, letters of recommendation, and the non-refundable $25 application fee, together in one packet. Applications are available on the Summer Camps page on the College’s website, and all materials are due by close of business on April 24th.

REHAMS lab group

REHAMS group and their student leader

Do you have any final thoughts for aspiring engineers who want to attend REHAMS or XCITE?

The College established REHAMS and XCITE to provide students from diverse communities an opportunity to create and experiment in a collaborative yet competitive environment that exposes them to life as a college student. I have one piece of advice for students out there reading this who are excited about the prospect of participating in one of the camps but unsure of whether or not they have what it takes to be engineers: Apply! You have potential; let us show you how far it can take you if you’re willing to work hard and invest in your own success.

REHAMS LSU Residential Engineering Camp

Dates: June 14-20, 2015
Location: LSU Campus
Application deadline: April 24, 2015
The cost of the camp is $400, inclusive of room and board, and there is a non-refundable $25 application fee.

XCITE LSU Residential Engineering Camp

Dates: July 12-18, 2015
Location: LSU Campus
Application deadline: April 24, 2015
The cost of the camp is $400, inclusive of room and board, and there is a non-refundable $25 application fee.

A limited number of need-based scholarships are available to qualified students. Check the REHAMS 2015 Application and XCITE 2015 Application on the Summer Camps website (www.eng.lsu.edu/prospective/camps) for eligibility requirements and guidelines.